How to Lose Weight with Kindness

 

If beating yourself up with your words (and inevitably your actions) worked, all of your issues with how to lose weight would be long gone!  Right?

You know the deal: you have a piece of cake at a family gathering, an accidental handful of m&m’s finds its way into your mouth, or a piece of pizza slides down your throat at a party.  You spend the rest of the night and next day and maybe even the next day (and the day after that?) telling yourself that your never going to succeed, you’re a failure, and a whole bunch of other things NSFB (Not Safe For Buzz).
And usually, adding insult to injury, this self-harming-word-fest extends your binge cycle for a bunch of days. #loselose 
This behavior clearly isn’t working, Buddies.  So why do we keep doing it? And, oh my goodness, how do we stop?
Old habits are hard to break, and this habit is among the oldest. No worries Buddies, this unfortunate and ineffective way you are talking to yourself is, as we say at Beacon, a problem to be solved.  Let’s get at it!
Shhhhhhhh.  Essentially, the solution to this problem lies in quieting our minds, right? Cue the oldest prescription of alllllll time: Meditation.  Literally PROVEN to quiet your mind, and so much more.  Tired of me talking about meditation as the cure to almost everything?  Sorry, I’m not sorry. The solution to how to lose weight is going to be largely in training your brain – and this is the most effective, tried and true way to do it.  What are you waiting for?  Commit to three minutes of meditation this week everyday – that’s 180 seconds I’m sure you can spare. 🙂
​​​​​​​That sweet little inner child. You know, I don’t get too therapist-y too often, so I’m going to pull my card right now.  Within each one of us is a little kid trying to heal and do their best.  I don’t think you intend to, but all of this negative and abusive self talk is making things worse not better – especially for your inner child.  Think of a five or six year old you know and love.  Extra credit: find a picture of yourself when YOU were five or six.  Would you ever say these things to them?  “You’re so fat and disgusting.” “You’re never going to succeed, who do you think you are?” “You’re pathetic.” Makes me cringe just writing it.  Think about that kid next time you’re in your self-hate spiral, apologize and move on.
Stop the Madness.  Speaking of moving on, no one who is trying as hard as you are is looking to get off track, relapse, binge, eat food that doesn’t serve you, and everything in between.  So if it happens, there is no need to make the situation worse by harming yourself with your thoughts.  Put down the bat and pick up a silk scarf.  
How to make this into an action?  Create an action plan that will help you to get back on track: a phone call to a Buddy, an inspirational song, some lavender scent, a long walk – whatever floats your boat.  Work to make a bad situation better, not worse.